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Posts tagged ‘poetry’

Your Creative Intentions: The Monday Post ~ September 21, 2015

Emily Dickinson quote

A regular creative practice — a daily practice, if possible — is key to staying in touch with how you make meaning. Key to living, not postponing. (Let’s all agree to give up on “someday.”)

What are your plans for creative practice this week? Given the specifics of your schedule, decide on a realistic intention or practice plan — and ink that time in your calendar. The scheduling part is important, because as you know, if you try to “fit it in” around the edges, it generally won’t happen. An intention as simple as “I will write for 20 minutes every morning after breakfast” or “I will sketch a new still life on Wednesday evening” is what it’s all about. If appropriate, use time estimates to containerize your task, which can make a daunting project feel more accessible.

Share your intentions or goals as a comment to this post. We use a broad brush in defining creativity, so don’t be shy. We also often include well-being practices that support creativity, such as exercise and journaling.

Share your intentions or goals as a comment to this post. Putting your intentions on “paper” helps you get clear on what you want to do — and sharing those intentions with this community leverages the motivation of an accountability group. Join us!

The image used in this week’s Monday Post is courtesy Betsy Gitelman. Thank you, Betsy!

If you would like to contribute a nature image for a future Monday Post, please send an e-mail to creativereality [at] live.com !

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If you’re an artist or writer with little ones, The Creative Mother’s Guide: Six Creative Practices for the Early Years is the essential survival guide written just for you. Concrete strategies for becoming more creative without adding stress and guilt. Filled with the wisdom of 13 insightful creative mothers; written by a certified creativity coach and mother of five. “Highly recommended.” ~Eric Maisel. 35 pages/$11.98. Available for download here.

Your Creative Intentions: The Monday Post ~ June 22, 2015

Wallace Stevens quote

A regular creative practice — a daily practice, if possible — is key to staying in touch with how you make meaning. Key to living, not postponing. (Let’s all agree to give up on “someday.”)

What are your plans for creative practice this week? Given the specifics of your schedule, decide on a realistic intention or practice plan — and ink that time in your calendar. The scheduling part is important, because as you know, if you try to “fit it in” around the edges, it generally won’t happen. An intention as simple as “I will write for 20 minutes every morning after breakfast” or “I will sketch a new still life on Wednesday evening” is what it’s all about. If appropriate, use time estimates to containerize your task, which can make a daunting project feel more accessible.

Share your intentions or goals as a comment to this post, and let us know how things went with your creative plans for last week, if you posted to last week’s Monday Post. We use a broad brush in defining creativity, so don’t be shy. We also often include well-being practices that support creativity, such as exercise and journaling.

Putting your intentions on “paper” helps you get clear on what you want to do — and sharing those intentions with this community leverages the motivation of an accountability group. Join us!

If you would like to contribute a nature image for a future Monday Post, please send an e-mail to creativereality [at] live.com !

:::::::

If you’re an artist or writer with little ones, The Creative Mother’s Guide: Six Creative Practices for the Early Years is the essential survival guide written just for you. Concrete strategies for becoming more creative without adding stress and guilt. Filled with the wisdom of 13 insightful creative mothers; written by a certified creativity coach and mother of five. “Highly recommended.” ~Eric Maisel. 35 pages/$11.98. Available for download here.

Meme of the Week

Osho_quote_meme

Happy Friday.

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Miranda: Art Every Day Month ~ Day 16

 Day 16 of Art Every Day Month (AEDM). Another poem in my series, although I paired this one with a photograph.


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Miranda: Art Every Day Month ~ Day 14

 Day 14 of Art Every Day Month (AEDM): Ink and watercolor doodle. Fairly self-explanatory, this one.



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Miranda: Art Every Day Month ~ Day 11

Day 11 of Art Every Day Month (AEDM): I had the pleasure of attending a Random Art Workshop (RAW) hosted by the lovely Mindy Tsonas of WishStudio in Newburyport, Mass. My cohort at the Minerva Project, Ellen Olson-Brown, came along for the fun. (Check out Ellen’s fabulous AEDM mini-book projects here!)

I played with a bunch of things at the RAW evening — stepping away from my poem collage series for a bit — including the watercolor sketch below. 

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Miranda: Art Every Day Month ~ Day 8

Day 8 of Art Every Day Month (AEDM). I have a few more poems bubbling up right now, so I’ll use the brief amount of time that I have to keep drafting — and will come back to the collage work in a bit. This poem is still very much a work in progress, so it might be quite different by the time I get to my collage.

203 New York

The United Nations concourse is closed
to the public and filled with live music.
Waiters in white jackets move across
highly polished marble, attending to
elaborate tables draped with partygoers
and champagne glasses.

An irresistible standard pulls my father
onto the dance floor beside me.
I cannot mask the glee, the visceral joy of
dancing with my father
a million miles from anywhere
at the center of everything
in borrowed clothes and onyx earrings.
I have never danced with my father before.

We are so full of grinning and laughter that
it’s almost too hard to dance.

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I’m posting my Art Every Day Month work here on a daily or near-daily basis. If you’d like to join in the fun, it’s not too late! Here’s all the info. And if you don’t have your own blog, you’re welcome to post your AEDM work here. Just comment on this post to let me know.

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