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Posts tagged ‘plan’

The Monday Post: 8.28.17

Victoria Moran quote

Happy Monday, friends! What in the creative realm would you like to accomplish this week? Comment below with the what, when, and how! And if you commented on last week’s Monday Post, let us know how things went: the hiccups as well as the successes.

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The Monday Post: 8.21.17

Patti Digh

Happy Monday, friends! What in the creative realm would you like to accomplish this week? Comment below with the what, when, and how!

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Time to Realign? A Life of Intention: Your Self-Paced, Virtual Weekend Retreat

A Life of Intention

The internet overflows with inspiration. Encouraging memes? Cheerleading blog posts? Want to hear that you’re awesome, you’re beautiful, you’re full of potential? No problem. We can spend hour upon hour feasting on words and images that fill us up and heal our wounds — at least on the surface. It feels good and can be extremely addictive.

At a certain point, however, you may look around and find yourself holding an empty bag. One day the interwebs aren’t as satisfying, even though you can still spend an entire afternoon on Pinterest and Instagram. Because it isn’t enough to see the vast beauty of the universe as it speeds by. We want to do something. We want to use our talents, not just affirm that they exist. We need to use our creativity to make meaning. All the pretty stuff starts to look like a whole lot of fluff and not a lot of substance. It’s an echo chamber to which many of us unwittingly contribute. That’s not a bad thing, but it might not serve you.

Get out the map

A Life of Intention: Your self-paced, virtual weekend retreat is a simple way to realign with what matters. You don’t need to reinvent sliced bread — or yourself. You already have plenty of ideas about where you want to go and what you want to do. But if you’re feeling adrift, those ideas and instincts need to be clarified. You need a plan. You don’t need to spend a bajillion dollars figuring it out — and there isn’t any magic system (God, how I wish there were a magic system!) that can have you waking up at dawn, completing masterpieces by noon, and serving your family gourmet, locally sourced meals every night while you prance around an immaculate dream house in your skinny jeans.

If only.

But maybe your reality is actually better than that. It is, after all, yours.

A Life of Intention is the gentle nudge and thoughtful friend that reconnects you with what matters. The program isn’t rocket science. It doesn’t take hours upon hours to complete, because we all know that you had all those hours at your disposal, you wouldn’t be feeling at loose ends.

When you purchase the self-paced, virtual weekend retreat, you will receive the access code to the retreat page via e-mail. There you will find the three sessions in full, with links to the documents you’ll need to download. You can complete all three sessions in one go, or spread them out — whatever works for you. If you don’t have a weekend to yourself, you can complete the assignments around the edges of your day. Your access code will be valid for 60 days. When you’ve completed the sessions, you’ll have a road map for the next 12 months and beyond.

$38. Click below to order. After you receive your access code, click here to log in.

Add to Cart

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Meme of the Week

Letting go

As found here. Happy Friday!

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Meme of the Week

THISYEAR2015

As found here. Happy New Year!

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Panster versus Plotter

planning_the_journeyDuring November, the interwebs were abuzz with National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo), the literary marathon during which participants bang out a 50,000-word novel in 30 days. A debate always emerges during NaNoWriMo, centered on a process question that is relevant to writers and artists alike. Which is better: pantser, or plotter?

A pantser, as the name implies, is one who flies by the seat of his or her pants. No outline, no roadmap, no limits. Pantsers feel constrained by outlines; many say that planning strips away their creative mojo. On the flip side, plotters prefer to know precisely which direction they’re headed in. A plotter novelist might produce a full set of index cards with each scene in bullet points before relaxing into the writing process. Writers in either camp vehemently defend their preferences (just google “pantser versus planner” and see for yourself).

Of course, neither approach is inherently better than the other. You need to do what works best for you. But sometimes we get stuck in what we think we “should” do, or what we learned from a mentor’s example, or what seems more legitimate. When that happens, it can be difficult to adopt the other method, even if it might be to our benefit.

The only way you’ll really know what works best for you is to try both. If the idea of planning your fiction feels frightening, give it a go. You might find inspiration in the clarity that an outline brings. And if you tend to plan the composition of your painting down to the last square centimeter, you might try purely intuitive work and see if that unlocks anything new.

The value of knowing if you’re a pantser or a plotter by nature—or if you fall somewhere in between—is that understanding your authentic process is part of your identity as an artist or writer. The more you understand (and anticipate) how you work, the more confident you become, and the more you are able to invest in your process rather than the outcome.

What works for you? (And if you participated in this year’s NaNoWriMo, hearty congratulations!)

This piece was originally published in Creativity Calling, the newsletter of the Creativity Coaching Association.

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