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Posts tagged ‘just do it’

Meme of the Week

Colleen Sgroi art quote

As found here. Happy Friday.

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Meme of the Week

Write something today, even if it sucks

As found here. Happy Friday.

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Your Creative Intentions: The Monday Post ~ July 22, 2013

Friedrich Nietzsche quote

Commit to a regular creativity practice. Regularity — a daily practice, if possible — is key to staying in touch with how you make meaning.

What are your plans for creative practice this week? Given the specifics of your schedule, decide on a realistic intention or practice plan — and ink that time in your calendar. The scheduling part is important, because as you know, if you try to “fit it in” around the edges, it generally won’t happen. An intention as simple as “I will write for 20 minutes every morning after breakfast” or “I will sketch a new still life on Wednesday evening” is what it’s all about. If appropriate, use time estimates to containerize your task, which can make a daunting project feel more accessible.

Share your intentions or goals as a comment to this post, and let us know how things went with your creative plans for last week, if you posted to last week’s Monday Post. We use a broad brush in defining creativity, so don’t be shy. We also often include well-being practices that support creativity, such as exercise and journaling.

Putting your intentions on “paper” helps you get clear on what you want to do — and sharing those intentions with this community leverages the motivation of an accountability group. Join us!

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If you’re an artist or writer with little ones, The Creative Mother’s Guide: Six Creative Practices for the Early Years is the essential survival guide written just for you. Concrete strategies for becoming more creative without adding stress and guilt. Filled with the wisdom of 13 insightful creative mothers; written by a certified creativity coach and mother of five. “Highly recommended.” ~Eric Maisel. 35 pages/$11.98. Available for download here.

Your Creative Intentions: The Monday Post ~ July 8, 2013

Chuck Close quote

Commit to a regular creativity practice. Regularity — a daily practice, if possible — is key to staying in touch with how you make meaning.

What are your plans for creative practice this week? Given the specifics of your schedule, decide on a realistic intention or practice plan — and ink that time in your calendar. The scheduling part is important, because as you know, if you try to “fit it in” around the edges, it generally won’t happen. An intention as simple as “I will write for 20 minutes every morning after breakfast” or “I will sketch a new still life on Wednesday evening” is what it’s all about. If appropriate, use time estimates to containerize your task, which can make a daunting project feel more accessible.

Share your intentions or goals as a comment to this post, and let us know how things went with your creative plans for last week, if you posted to last week’s Monday Post. We use a broad brush in defining creativity, so don’t be shy. We also often include well-being practices that support creativity, such as exercise and journaling.

Putting your intentions on “paper” helps you get clear on what you want to do — and sharing those intentions with this community leverages the motivation of an accountability group. Join us!

:::::::

If you’re an artist or writer with little ones, The Creative Mother’s Guide: Six Creative Practices for the Early Years is the essential survival guide written just for you. Concrete strategies for becoming more creative without adding stress and guilt. Filled with the wisdom of 13 insightful creative mothers; written by a certified creativity coach and mother of five. “Highly recommended.” ~Eric Maisel. 35 pages/$11.98. Available for download here.

Meme of the Week

the_book_meme

Happy Friday.

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The Perils of Plan B

Right-brainers sometimes feel like square pegs in a world of analysis and due diligence. Until recently, passion and intuition haven’t been particularly valued. You’re zealous about ethnomusicology, Petrarchan sonnets, or encaustic painting? Don’t pursue anything in school — so we’re told — that doesn’t point to reliable income at the other end. We’re taught to be generalists, as if being mediocre at everything is somehow more secure than being really good at what we love. We’re told to play it safe, consider every possibility, and have a solid Plan B.

But as writers like Seth Godin and Daniel Pink observe, the old rules have changed. Thanks to the internet, playing it safe doesn’t cut it anymore. Whether it’s big business, the blogosphere, or the creative world, success is increasingly defined by those who do what they love with singular clarity, and do it well. Given passion and persistence, do we really need to waste so much time fretting over “what if?”

Last year, I moved from the paradigm of “I need to think about it” firmly into “heck, yeah!” — and I’m not looking back. I stopped considering Creativity Coaching Association certification and declared my candidacy. Was this decision based on an analysis of critical risks and return on investment? No. I wanted to do it. I’d find the cash and make the time: it would come together. And it did. I finished my certification within the calendar year and now coach clients. It’s everything I imagined.

In October, I co-led a workshop in life design with Ellen Olson-Brown. We could have fine-tuned our curriculum for months, fussed with our marketing plan, and listened to the inner voices that shouted, “But wait! You don’t have a safety net! This is all going too quickly and you don’t know what you’re doing!” Ignoring those voices, I followed the advice I offer my clients: Trust that you know what you’re doing, even when you don’t know. Our workshop went so well that we’ve opened a brick-and-mortar studio for creativity and life design.

If “what if” is getting in your way, grab what you love, and go for it.

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This article was originally published in Creativity Calling, the newsletter of the Creativity Coaching Association. Reprinted by permission.

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